The 2018-2019 Design Team

(Team ILLenials)

Team ILLenials created and designed a multifamily complex regarding real world issues last year. The team chose their design to be located in Austin, Texas, where specific attention had been given to the regional climate, local demographic demands, community living and self-sufficiency tactics. This building is called ARC: Architecture, Resilience and Community. Team ILLennials had adopted a systems-thinking approach to the design. There were two main design goals: sustainable urban community living and resiliency to flash floods.

The Design Team completed this design project and attended the Solar Decathlon Design Challenge Weekend in Colorado, where they presented their designs to a panel of industry expert jurors, compare their projects to those of other teams, learn from presentations by thought leaders and collegiate peers, and engage with a variety of organizations about energy careers. Winning teams were recognized at an Awards Banquet, and winning project presentations were published on the website. The competition and winners were promoted through a variety of media outreach efforts, which provide participants and their collegiate institutions an opportunity for national exposure. 

 

Collegiate institutions that participate in the challenge are recognized as leaders who are producing career-ready professionals with cutting-edge skills. Industry partners who collaborate with teams gain national and local recognition and have the opportunity to interact with knowledgeable future design and construction professionals.

Team ILLenials created and designed a multifamily complex regarding real world issues last year. The team chose their design to be located in Austin, Texas, where specific attention had been given to the regional climate, local demographic demands, community living and self-sufficiency tactics. This building is called ARC: Architecture, Resilience and Community. Team ILLennials had adopted a systems-thinking approach to the design. There were two main design goals: sustainable urban community living and resiliency to flash floods.

The Design Team completed this design project and attended the Solar Decathlon Design Challenge Weekend in Colorado, where they presented their designs to a panel of industry expert jurors, compare their projects to those of other teams, learn from presentations by thought leaders and collegiate peers, and engage with a variety of organizations about energy careers. Winning teams were recognized at an Awards Banquet, and winning project presentations were published on the website. The competition and winners were promoted through a variety of media outreach efforts, which provide participants and their collegiate institutions an opportunity for national exposure. 

 

Collegiate institutions that participate in the challenge are recognized as leaders who are producing career-ready professionals with cutting-edge skills. Industry partners who collaborate with teams gain national and local recognition and have the opportunity to interact with knowledgeable future design and construction professionals.

The east side of the ARC

The interior of one of the apartments

Illinois Solar Decathlon has competed in 3 Solar Decathlon competitions in the US and 2 in China. Moreover, 4 teams have participated in the Race to Zero competition. The team was fortunate to have a broad array of talent across diverse majors and backgrounds. This includes undergraduates and graduates hailing from the College of Architecture, the Departments of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE), Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE), Nuclear, Plasma & Radiological Engineering (NPRE), Mechanical Science & Engineering (ME) and Agricultural & Biological Engineering (ABE). To enable effective management, the team is divided into subteams; each focusing on a certain aspect of the design. Subteam leads manage students on the specialized subteam and are responsible for providing insight on how their area of the project should
develop. They work directly with their peers to educate members on sustainable practices and techniques, cultivate general building science skills and set goals pertaining to the development of the project. Sub-team leads are also the point of contact with faculty advisors. 

To learn more about the Design Team Challenge, visit:

https://www.solardecathlon.gov/2019/design/challenge.html

Team Illinois Micro-munity 2017-2018

Ten out of 15 of the fastest growing U.S. cities are in the South, where the car is the primary mode of transportation. Other large southern cities such as Dallas, Houston, Atlanta and Phoenix, have average commute distances of over 11 miles whereas the average commute for most large metro areas is 7.7 miles. This sprawl is created due to haphazardly planned developments and is increasing car usage and traffic. As these cities grow, price bubbles are created in the most appealing neighborhoods and pushing existing residents out of their homes. The Team Illinois project, Micro-munity, focuses on exemplifying how locals can transition to a public transportation-based lifestyle and live denser. Living in a more urban and denser environment decreases housing costs and makes areas more affordable. This is needed in order to mitigate the problems that have been the pitfalls of previously developed cities. Charlotte, North Carolina was chosen for this project because its location provides the perfect example of this issue. The city is growing fast, and consequently, public transit infrastructure is too. However, developers are still designing for the car-based lifestyle. This mindset must change to focus on pedestrians. Micro-munity attempts to set a precedent to influence and inform responsible development in the future of urban American neighborhoods.

Illinois Solar Decathlon 2019

Contact: uiucsolardecathlon@gmail.com

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